Posts Tagged ‘hydrocortisone’

I Think the Eczema Is Finally Going Away!

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

Well, it would seem that we have finally had a breakthrough. Through a strange series of circumstances (namely, me getting a 24-hour bug which messed with my digestion big time, slowing it to a crawl for almost a week, until a friend did a treatment on me), we discovered Bowen therapy. Now, Bowen is usually used for injuries, like sports injuries, not for issues like eczema, but since one simple move that took less than 3 seconds to do had so dramatically fixed my digestion (and by dramatically, I mean that I felt better instantly), and since my friend who told me about the therapy suggested that Manny might be benefited by it, we found a therapist and scheduled an appointment.

After the treatment, we didn’t notice any results, but we decided it was worth scheduling one more treatment. Around that time, we realized that he was reacting to yeast (he would eat a slice of yeast-raised bread, throw it up, eat half of a second slice, throw it up, etc). His body was rejecting it, and yet he could eat all the other ingredients in the bread in other forms (like pancakes), so we knew it had to be the yeast. So we cut all yeast out of his diet–switched to soda bread, quit using nutritional yeast, etc. About 6 weeks later, ie, today, he is able to tolerate them again. It would seem that the Bowen therapy, although it didn’t have any dramatic results with him like it did with me, really did help him, and now his body is at a place where it can heal.

His face was getting better. Within the past week or two, the eczema that was chronically around his mouth has begun to heal, and by heal, I mean disappear. His face is about 90% clear now (if you don’t count the scratches he got from playing outside), and in another week or two, if he keeps going as he has begun, it just may be totally gone. Behind his knees has also almost completely cleared. We noticed it improving even though we hadn’t used any hydrocortisone for several days. My husband put a little on once or twice within the past few days just to hurry up the healing, but I haven’t put any on, him, and he certainly hasn’t had it every day. I’m really excited about this. I am going to watch him, and if he continues to improve, I will ask his doctor if we can do another IgE test in a month or two and see if his score has come down (last time it was over 3,000).

This is probably unrelated, but I have started giving him B12 shots again (.1 ml of methylcobalamin every day, or at least every day when I remember it–probably more like 3-4 times a week). I doubt this caused the dramatic healing, but I’m sure it hasn’t hurt anything, either.

So it seems that the combination of avoiding yeast (which was hindering healing) and doing the Bowen therapy has been exactly what he needed to allow his body to heal. Indeed, if he is healing on the outside, he must be healing on the inside. If that’s the case, then it may be that his sensitivities to many foods may diminish or even disappear. That would be such a blessing!

That’s where we’re at at the moment. I’ll keep you posted as to how things go and the results of any tests we do in the future.

My Baby Has Eczema: The Cause Found and the Healing Begun

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

It has been 5 months since the last post, and a lot has happened. Before I fill you in on the results of the stool test, what we did as a result, and the results, let me briefly review our journey with my son’s eczema for those who don’t have time to read all the posts from the beginning.

He developed eczema at 1 month old. It was diagnosed around 3 months, and we tried to avoid all steroids, even hydrocortisone. But he was a really miserable little baby. We tried everything, even goat’s milk formula (turned out all dairy is off limits, not just cow), and I restricted my diet to the point of frustration until he was weaned at 12 months. We added Triamcinalon, a medium-level steroid around 18 months just to control the symptoms, and not long after that we started to see a naturopath who was recommended by his pediatrician. When I ended the last post, we were waiting on the results of a stool test.

Test Results

The results came late in February. For insurance reasons, they were sent to his pediatrician, and we received a copy in the mail as well, which we shared with the naturopath at the next visit. It just so happened that my son got a bad cold that turned into bronchitis just after the test results arrived, and before the scheduled naturopath’s visit–which I think got delayed for some reason, probably the cold. My husband took him (since I think I was also feeling under the weather at the time), and the pediatrician went over the results of the stool test.

In a nutshell, he had a gut full of pathogenic bacteria. Which confirmed his suspicion that the source of the eczema was in his gut.

Let me explain a little. You may have heard about beneficial bacteria in the gut. They help to digest food and do other things. They coat the surface of the intestines. If they are killed off and yeast (such as candida) is present, the yeast will multiply to fill in the gaps. On the other hand, they can be killed off by pathogenic bacteria–and they had certainly been doing that, because showed almost no beneficial bacteria in the test at all, in spite of all the probiotics he had taken for the past year. There were also neutral bacteria, neither beneficial nor harmful, but taking the place of the good bacteria.

The doctor, of course, prescribed antibiotics to treat the bronchitis. Normally I would have hesitated, but when I realized that some of the pathogenic bacteria was susceptible to the antibiotic, I figured this would be a way of killing two birds with one stone!

Not long after we met with the naturopath. He reviewed the test results and explained them to me. He asked us to up the Infaskin probiotics that had already proved to help him so much, to counteract the antibiotics. I think he also upped the Vitamin D from 1,000 IU to 2,000, because he felt Manny could be getting a little more of that.

On a side note, the results for the parasite test came in later, and they were negative. He also showed a little yeast, but it didn’t seem to be a significant problem. Especially since he eats mostly gluten-free grains and I sweeten his home-made rice or teff milk with stevia, so his sources of sugars are quite limited.

What Happened As a Result

Just around the time the antibiotic treatment finished, a tree fell on our house. It was quite a disaster, and we’re still not back in our home almost 5 months later. That was March 15th. We spent the next 10 days living with some friends in their house nearby, and during that time, we used the Triamcinalon for the last time. We haven’t used it since.

Over the months since then, I have watched my son’s skin steadily improve. He went from breaking out in small patches most everywhere to breaking out only on his tummy, face, neck, groin, and folds of elbows and knees. And in the last month I haven’t noticed anything on his tummy. I ran out of the prescription 2.5% hydrocortisone and bought some 1% at the drug store recently. I remember when we would go through a 2 oz. tube in a week, but now I think that tube will last us a couple of months–and I don’t use it every day, at least, not on the same spot two days in a row. He scratches less. He’s a happy little 2-year-old when he’s not having a melt-down. And he’s steadily improving. At the last visit with the naturopath–back in May, I think–he didn’t change anything about his treatment and scheduled his next appointment for September, saying to only call if he got worse or stopped improving. Which he hasn’t.

So that’s the latest. He’s not cured, but he’s on the way. It’s going to be a while before we start trying things we have eliminated from his diet, though we occasionally try new things (like parsnips–he likes them and they don’t cause a reaction, yay!).

So now it’s your turn. Share this story with others or share your story. What have you done that has worked? What didn’t work? Every case is unique, and what worked for Manny might not work for the next reader. But what worked for you might. If you would like to share your story here as a post instead of just in a comment, let me know!

My Baby Has Eczema: Trying Natural Methods Again

Friday, February 4th, 2011

Last week I shared about how we found a new doctor when we moved and eventually started using the steroid Triamcinalon. Once the pediatrician had exhausted his store of resources, and after a couple visits to an allergist proved that we were already doing everything conventional medicine had to offer, we decided to try a naturopath recommended by the pediatrician.

Dr. Dramov in Tigard

Dr. Dramov has got to be one of the nicest doctors I have ever met. Unlike your average MDs, he greets his patients in the waiting room and goes with them through every step of the visit. If he has an assistant other than the receptionist, I haven’t seen one. He acted like he has all day, asking me several times per visit if there is anything else I want to ask–very thorough.

During the first visit, he went over Manny’s history of eczema and asked what we were giving him. Then he asked me to try several things: upping the probiotics he was already taking, adding quercitin, switching from the digestive enzyme we were using to one with ox bile in it, and adding in evening primrose oil. We were to make one change per week, and to not add the next thing if we noticed improvement.

Well, we did our best, but nothing made the slightest difference. I had gotten him to where I was using the Triamcinalon only every other day most of the time, but I couldn’t taper off more than that. He would just get worse if I tried.

B12 Shots and a New Probiotic

At the next visit, he told me that he had just been to some kind of medical convention to learn more about the treatment of eczema. He said there were two things that seemed to help that we weren’t already doing: B12 supplements, either sublingual or shots, and a special probiotic called InfaSkin. He had ordered the InfaSkin, but it hadn’t arrived yet. My husband picked it up later.

He asked me how I wanted to do then B12. Because I wasn’t sure how well the sublinguals would work on such a small child (by this time he was just weeks away from his second birthday), I opted for the shots. He showed me how to give them, doing the first one himself. Then he sold me the tiny vial of serum and enough insulin syringes to last a month. I bought a sharps container at the drug store, and have since gotten so good at them that my son actually likes his daily shot!

It was almost two weeks after that visit that my husband was able to stop and get the InfaSkin probiotics. We started him on them on a Tuesday or Wednesday. Within two days, I knew they were doing something; I hadn’t reached for the Triamcinalon since his first dose! In fact, he was able to go 4 or 5 days without it–his longest stretch ever! I still used the hydrocortisone 2.5%, but I was actually using less of it. As you can imagine, I was thrilled! This was the first non-drug anything to actually make a difference!

Further Tests

At this second visit, the doctor also ordered stool and blood tests. We will get the results of those tests at our next visit, which will be next Friday

A couple of weeks after starting the Infaskin, I received samples of Renew lotion. Rather than repeat myself, I’ll just refer you to the post that tells what results Renew had on my son.

This brings the story up-to-date. I will continue to post updates as they occur. Now it’s your turn. Would you like to share your story? If so, please contact me; I would love to publish others’ stories here on this blog.

My Baby Has Eczema: New House, New Doctor, New Plan

Friday, January 28th, 2011

Last week I shared about how my life spiraled out of control as I watched my baby get worse and worse, with no end in sight. My emotions were out of control, and I didn’t know what to do about it.

New Home

I had been resisting going to a regular doctor (MD) out of fear. My husband worked for Child Protective Services, and he told me that a doctor had turned a mother in to CPS for not following the treatment he had outlined for her child. I didn’t want to have a doctor prescribe steroids for my son and then turn me in to CPS if I didn’t use them! But I was getting to the point that I couldn’t handle things the way they were. My son was miserable nearly all the time. If I put him down to practice crawling, he would put his face down on the carpet and rub back and forth. I knew I had to do something. Besides, the naturopath he had been going to had pretty much exhausted her knowledge of the subject.

My husband and I realized that we needed to have him home more. He worked an hour away, and the 2-hour round-trip commute was killing him, especially on top of all the stress we were dealing with. So he started looking for a place to rent near his work, and I decided it was time to start using the hydrocortisone more than just a tiny bit on the worst areas, as I had been.

New Doctor

I also decided it was time to find another doctor. I didn’t know where to start, but I knew of a place where I could ask for recommendations. So I logged into Mamapedia.com and asked the moms in my area for a recommendation. I specified that I wanted a doctor that would look favorably on alternative options and that would not be bothered by the fact that I had chosen to delay vaccinations.

I only received one reply, but it was a recommendation for a doctor that was only 3 or 4 miles away from my husband’s work–and even closer to the house we were going to rent! Integrative Pediatrics with Dr. Paul Thomas was her suggestion, and I eagerly checked out the website. When I read that “it is the goal of Integrative Pediatrics to bring the best of complementary, alternative and holistic medicine,” I was sold. I called and made an appointment for as soon as I could–which happened to be several days before the actual move.

The doctor was very understanding of our choice not to vaccinate yet, and even supportive of it as he learned more about Manny’s situation. I have found many swollen lymph glands on him–in the back of his neck, in his groin, and maybe some other places. For all we know, they are probably all swollen. This indicates an immune system response, and is likely a side effect of the allergies he has. His doctor believes that adding vaccinations to the picture is just not a good idea at this point.

Allergy Tests

While he encouraged me to continue using the hydrocortisone as needed to relieve the symptoms, and even suggested Benadryl (which actually made him break out more, so we stopped that), his main line of attack was with natural things. He did an IgG food sensitivity test and later an IgE food and environmental allergy test. The results told him that Manny has some kind of internal irritation that is causing the external manifestation of eczema; he is more or less sensitive to almost every food they tested on the IgG test, with a few exceptions (mostly meat, which we don’t eat, and random things like bananas and beets). He also had an IgE count of almost 3,000–the highest the pediatrician had ever seen–and was allergic to almost every food they tested, except chocolate and yeast and meat.

When we got the results of the IgG test back (the IgE test didn’t come until months later), I modified my diet to match up, hoping that his eczema would subside, even if only a little. It didn’t. Only the hydrocortisone helped anything. I began to dream of weaning him so that we could feed him an even more limited diet than I could manage to do myself, and maybe we could eliminate all the bad foods and he would clear up. So just before he turned 12 months I started the process of weaning him, cutting out one feeding per week, until by 2 weeks after his first birthday he was totally weaned. But his eczema didn’t clear up. Then I felt bad about weaning him, but I just couldn’t stay on his diet anymore. I ignored the criticism from those who said I should have nursed longer, knowing that I was doing the best I could. I had nursed my daughter for 20 months and wanted to nurse my son until 2 years at least, but I could not imagine another 12 months of eating such a bland, limited diet. In the end, I’m glad I did, because not long after weaning him we figured out that he was allergic to some of the things I had been using in my diet to replace things we already knew he was allergic to (for instance, he is highly allergic to sunflower seeds, which I was using to make a “sour cream” to replace the dairy version), and when we eliminated those foods, he stopped breaking out during meals like he had so many times when I was nursing him.

But back to the doctor. I was very pleased when he didn’t push steroids right off the bat; instead he suggested a regimen of probiotics, vitamin D, Omega 3 oils, digestive enzymes, and multivitamins. Over the months we found sources for all of these things in forms that he could handle (for instance, try finding multivitamins for children that don’t have some food substance in them took us quite a while). He also encouraged us to rotate his diet so that he didn’t eat the same foods every day, as a means of preventing new sensitivities from forming.

We Try Steroid Cream

Of course, by using the hydrocortisone .5% and sometimes the 1%, we were able to clear up the worst of the skin issues. His little cheeks no longer oozed, and the yeast infection in the folds of skin on his neck cleared up, since it was no longer raw and oozing there. Patches of good skin began to reappear around the areas of inflamed skin, and gradually the symptoms began to subside, little by little.

However, it never really cleared up. At his 18-month check-up (or maybe it was a 2 or 3 months later, I don’t remember) when the doctor asked if I would like to try something a little stronger to help control the symptoms, I agreed. He prescribed Triamcinalon, a medium-level steroid cream, and said to use it once a day or less, as needed, but not on the face or genitals.

I felt a little guilty about using this steroid, but at the same time, I realized that he was a much happier little boy. And besides, the steroid was not our main plan of attack. It was just something to keep the eczema at bay while we continued searching for the cause.

I remember there was a patch on my son’s wrist that had been encroaching on the back of his hand. The hydrocortisone had calmed it, but it simply would not go away. Manny’s father is Hispanic, so his natural skin color is a pale olive complexion. However, the eczema had bleached it as white as a readhead’s skin.  Wherever a patch of eczema would clear up, the skin would slowly get its natural color back. However, this patch would not clear up. Until I started putting the Triamcinalon on it. When I did, it cleared up and hasn’t come back! So now I don’t need to use it there anymore. That taught me that sometimes when the eczema gets too far, it really does need something to get it back under control. I can control pretty much anything on his arms with hydrocortisone and am using less of the Triamcinalon now that I did when I first started.

Of course, not every patch of eczema was that easy to clear up. But gradually his overall natural color began to show up, and some places would be almost cleared up at times. I finally got to where I was using the Triamcinalon only every other day, using just hyrocortisone on the odd days.

But I wasn’t able to cut it out entirely.

Allergist’s Opinion

Shortly after starting the Triamcinalon, at the suggestion of his doctor, we visited an allergist. That, for us, was a waste of time and money. I know many people have been helped by an allergist, but for us, by the time we went, we had already figured out almost everything he was truly allergic to, and the allergist wasn’t willing to subject such a young child to allergy testing, since he, as he put it, “he will probably outgrow most of them anyway.” Since being weaned at 12 months, he had been on a strict, fairly hypoallergenic diet, and we had also been on a fairly good moisturizing plan, so the allergist’s conclusion was that we were doing everything right and hopefully he would outgrow his allergies. And now we have a bill that we are hoping we can pay with our tax refund.

By this time, we had bought a house an hour away from my husband’s work–again. It was the only one we could afford that met most of our needs. We  decided to keep his pediatrician–especially when the allergist said he was one of the best pediatricians in the Portland area–but he was a pediatrician, not a skin disease specialist, and he was running out of ideas now too. He was convinced that the cause of Manny’s eczema was somehow tied to irritation in the gut, but he didn’t have the time or resources to really dig into that. So he suggested that we try going to a naturopath that specialized in gastrointestinal issues. So we made an appointment with the naturopath after our second visit to the allergist.

Next week I will tell you about the visits to the naturopath, what we tried, and what the results have been. That post will bring this story up to the the present day. This story is far from finished. But now you have an overview of my son’s life.

So in the mean time, please share with us about your experience with doctors and steroids–or your avoidance of either. Also, if you have something that worked for you, feel free to share it in the comments. If you want to share something with me but you don’t want to name it in the comments, please use the contact page to contact me directly. Thank you for reading and consider subscribing so you won’t miss the rest of the story!

This post is mentioned on Blogelina’s Blogging Buddy Blog Hop.

My Baby Has Eczema: Emotional Emergency

Friday, January 21st, 2011

By Heo2035 on Flickr

The emotional frustration of watching my child suffer began to manifest itself in troubling ways. My husband’s work was an hour away, which meant that I had to get up early and get his meals ready. Manny wasn’t sleeping through the night, and he and his sister rarely napped at the same time, so I was gradually becoming more and more sleep deprived. And on top of it all, Manny continued to get worse. I felt like I was headed for a breakdown. I just couldn’t take much more.

I felt like I needed some kind of outlet–some way to just forget the problem I was facing. Facebook became an obsession–especially the games. I alsodiscovered that I could watch movies online for free, and I wasted hours watching things I wish I had never watched. Nothing really horrible, mind you, just I wish I hadn’t wasted my time there. I justified it at the time by telling myself that I didn’t have the energy for anything else, but I still felt very guilty about what I was doing, and especially for all the things I was neglecting to do. That guilt began to eat away at my self respect, which which just made me feel worse. It was a vicious cycle.

My daughter was getting out of control during this time. The girl that had been so cheerfully obedient before age 2 was becoming just like every two-year-old in the world. It was very discouraging, because I didn’t have the the motivation to do what I knew what I knew I should to get her back to where she had been.

Vacation Made It Worse

Thinking that getting away for a while would help, I went to visit my cousins who had come out from back east to stay with family who lived just a few hours away. I took the kids with me for the 3 hour trip, and my husband joined me a week later. It was a nice change of pace, but thanks to late-night games and visiting, I got even more behind on sleep, and Manny was as bad as ever. This made it very hard for me. I actually hunted up a doctor nearby to see if there was something I could do to help him. I was leery of going to a regular MD (I’ll discuss this more in a future post), so I found a naturopath. She was very nice, but not very helpful. I came away with an expensive skin cream and advice to go gluten free. But I just couldn’t go gluten free yet–not on vacation–and the cream didn’t really help in the long run.

When I got home, things really got out of control. I was more sleep-deprived from the vacation than I had been before, and I couldn’t catch up. Fatigue from lack of sleep combined with emotional distress to make my life almost unbearable. I wasn’t coping anymore. So I retreated deeper into myself, spending more and more time on my coping mechanisms–movies, games, etc. Of course that didn’t help. I began to resent my son, which of course made me feel even more guilty. I would break down and cry for no apparent reason. This really frustrated my husband; at times he didn’t want to come home from work to face the turmoil he knew would be there.

Trying to convey exactly how I felt is difficult. Of course, if you are reading this blog, you just might know exactly what I was going through! It was such a complex mixture of guilt and frustration that I haven’t even yet sorted it out. All I know is that watching my little boy suffer was the hardest thing for me. Nothing was working. There didn’t seem to be any natural cream available that would calm the itch, and figuring out what was causing the eczema in the first place seemed futile.

Fear of Steroids

During this time, I was in mortal dread of using steroids of any kind. I used hydrocortisone .5% as sparingly as possible, and only on the worst areas. I had read of people who cleared their child’s skin with steroids, only to have the rash come back with a vengeance once they stopped. I had heard that there was a connection between eczema and asthma, and I tended to believe the theory that the suppression of the skin inflammation pushed the reaction inward to the lungs, thus causing asthma. I do not known if this is true or not; I’m sure allergists have some other fancy explanation for it. All I knew is that my son didn’t have asthma, and I didn’t want him to get it.  Suffice it to say that I was very leery of using any steroid at all–even one as minor as hydrocortisone. Also, I kept hearing from other eczema sufferers to avoid steroids at all cost, and wanting what was best for my baby, I took their advice.

My husband supported my choices of treatment for the most part, but from other family members and friends I got a lot of criticism. “Why don’t you take him to a real doctor?” was a line I heard many times. Apparently a naturopath wasn’t considered a real doctor. “He needs to see an allergist; maybe you can figure out what all he is allergic to.” No one seemed to understand my desire to exhaust as many natural, alternative options as I could before I submitted to a more traditional approach. We tried homeopathy, a form of acupuncture known as NAET (acupressure, actually), various creams and lotions–I even made my own skin cream! Nothing worked.

I got to the lowest point just shortly before we moved. We had decided that we would move to the city where my husband worked so that he could spend more time at home and less driving. So my husband started looking for a house to rent near his work, and I tried to pack.

Near Breakdown Decisions

Around the time we were making the decision to move, I had one of my mini-breakdowns–crying uncontrollably and just needing reassurance. I called one of my friends from church, hoping she would point me to the Lord, since I felt so disconnected from God. Instead, she did her best to wake me up to the fact that if I didn’t do something, I was not going to be able to care for my children much longer. She even got an appointment for me at some clinic so my son could be seen by a “real” doctor. I resented that, as did my husband, and we asked her to cancel it. However, I realized that with the upcoming move, I needed to find a local doctor, so I began hunting. And I also realized that my friend had a point. If I had a mental breakdown, I wasn’t going to be able to function even the little that I still was.

That week I started using the hydrocortisone .5% wherever there was irritation, not just in the worst spots.

Next week I will share about how I picked a new doctor and the changes that we made as a result.

Can you relate to my pain? What was it like for you to watch your child suffer and feel so helpless? If you want to talk about it, this is the place. Feel free to share in the comments or join the blogfrog community and start a discussion. And don’t forget to subscribe so you won’t miss the rest of the story.

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Breaking News!

One of my readers just contacted me about a skin cream that has helped a couple of eczema sufferers that she knows. She graciously offered to send me some samples. I am going to test itfor two weeks and take notes on the effects. When I’m done, I will share the results with you right here on this blog, so stay tuned!

Help! My Baby Has Eczema: The Beginning

Friday, January 7th, 2011

My son was born at home on January 17, 2009. He was 7 pounds 12 ounces–just like his sister had been. Perfect. Precious. Adorable. We had no idea what was ahead.

When he was around one month old, I started noticing what looked like baby acne. The doctor didn’t seem concerned about it. Then a few weeks later he started getting puffiness an redness around his eyes.  You can see it in the next picture. Once we determined that this was not something in his eyes, we watched as it gradually spread and eventually he was diagnosed with eczema.

I am familiar with eczema. My brother had it growing up, and we were able to control it with a limited diet and some cream that mom put on it. It was mostly on his tummy, and it bothered him some, but usually only if he ate something he wasn’t supposed to eat. I learned to read labels. He grew out of it sometime around puberty and eats everything today–even the wheat that he was born allergic to.

But this was nothing like my brother’s eczema. Within two or three months it spread over almost his entire body, until he looked and felt absolutely miserable. Sweat irritated him, and summer was coming. I watched as the patches of “good skin” got smaller and smaller, finally disappearing under the onslaught of the advancing raw, irritated, itchy skin that is characteristic of eczema.

I remember the doctor asking me about a “bruise” over his sternum. I hastened to assure her that that was no bruise, but rather a patch of good skin surrounded by bleached bad skin. You see, the eczema actually bleaches his skin. He got a light olive complexion from his father (who is Hispanic), but when suffering from the ravages of eczema he is whiter than I am.

Although he didn’t look very white. He looked awful. Here’s a picture one of my cousins took of him when he was about six months old. You can see how red and irritated his cheeks were. Sadly, this was also the state of his tummy and thighs. The red patches were raw and oozing a lot of the time.

Now, I had done some research, and I had heard that there was a link between eczema and asthma. That what was causing the skin irritation was toxins or something the body was getting rid of through the skin that was causing such irritation. The theory was that if this was suppressed (by the use of steroids) that the irritation would go inward to the lungs and cause asthma. Indeed, many children with eczema also have asthma. For this reason, I was leery of using any steroid cream at all–even hydrocortisone. I used it only on the worst areas, and as sparingly as possible.

During this time, I also tried to figure out what was causing this problem. I systematically eliminated wheat, soy, eggs, and milk from my diet, one by one, trying to figure out what was causing such a reaction. There was no change. (I should say that after testing each one, I added it back in to my diet, so I was only avoiding one food at a time.) Finally we had a rather unconventional allergy test done (electroacu-something–some kind of thing where they tested for electrical responses on the skin) and it pinpointed several foods. I cut those foods out of my diet. Nothing changed. I began to wonder how long it was going to take to see a change, since he seemed to be getting steadily worse.

Then I heard about NAET. Desperate to try anything, we went for several sessions. Nothing changed. Granted, we didn’t give it long enough. But money ran out, and I’m not sure it was doing anything anyway. I don’t want to go into that here. I was willing to try anything, but I wonder if it is a valid thing or if it something dangerous. I don’t have the answer. All I know is, it didn’t work and we’ve moved on.

By this time, I was really becoming emotionally drained. Trying to deal emotionally with the fact that my precious baby was suffering so much was just too much for me. I will share more about that in a future post. Next week I will share with you more about the things we tries in terms of diet to find a solution. I will post an instalment of this series every Friday morning until I finish–however long that takes. So stay tuned to see how I coped and what turned things around for us, and consider subscribing so you don’t miss out on the rest of the story.


This post was originally published on the Life of a Happy Mom blog. You can read more comments on this post here.